• julia

Course Accesbility

I don't have too much up on my course yet except for its skeletal framework (the modules, discussion forums, and assignments/grades).


I have a part of the syllabus done but am still currently working on it, and I'm debating how I should upload the readings onto the course to make it as accessible as possible.


Regardless, this week's assignment asked us to do a course accessibility assessment on whatever we had. I decided to go with the basic checklist for online content accessibility available through MSU's Web Access Portal. This basic checklist focuses on text, headings, lists, multimedia, and added context.


I do not plan on doing video lectures, so accessibility requirements regarding video lectures do not apply in my context. However, they will apply when it comes to the "accessible PDFs" for the readings that I plan on including. The course I'm envisioning will require a lot of books, and so I'm trying to find books that are available as Kindle books that have the "read aloud" feature for students who require it.


To continue, here's my quick accessibility assessment of my course in its current state:


Text and Contrast:

I've tried to only use black text and am using bolding, underlining, and italics in order to show emphasis as opposed to using color. I've opted to change the background image to something a little bit darker for the course banner itself so the white text stands out more. I don't know if D2L allows for the entire appearance of the course to change, though, and will need to play around with that since dark backgrounds + light text create hte best contrast.


Heading Styles:

I've divided the course into six modules, each with their own submodules to demonstrate the hierarchy of the content.


List Styles:

Similar to heading styles, I've opted to use lists and bullet points where I can to help organize the content to show its hierarchical place in terms of the module.


Alternative Text:

I haven't incorporated images into the course yet, and will use alternative text whenever I do use an image.


Multiple Avenues for Multimedia:

I don't plan on using my own video lectures, but the YouTube videos I'll be including will have transcripts and closed captioning available on them.


Added Context:

I'm trying my best to use descriptive titles for the modules and headers to make it as a clear as possible for a student navigating the course. I think once I have the syllabus nailed down a bit better I can add more context to the contents.


Tables:

The only "table" for the course would be the grading criteria, and I don't necessarily need a table to translate that content.



© 2018 by Julia DeCook.